Pettyboro Farm

The Hannaway conservation area, called Pettyboro Farm, has sweeping fields and surrounding forest.

Bill and Lorraine Hanaway have been spending summers in Lyman since the mid-1980s.  Avid hikers, they were drawn to the White Mountains and introduced to the area by friends in Sugar Hill, and as avid hikers, they quickly fell in love with the White Mountains. Soon, they were looking for a place of their own, and found the perfect spot in Lyman. A former farm property on Pettyboro Road still had a historic clapboard house, expansive fields, and stately forest. Over the years they added adjacent parcels. Their most generous gift of a conservation easement covers 160 acres.

Bill & Lorraine Hanaway

Their daughter Annie, son-in-law Peter, and grandson Will, who live in Portland, Oregon, visit and love this place, which Annie will inherit.  Annie and Peter talk of living in Lyman someday, perhaps using the land for agriculture of some kind. The Hanaway’s conservation easement encourages agricultural use.

Bill and Lorraine wanted to permanently protect their land so it will always be available for the many species of wildlife that call it home, and so that it may be in active farming someday. Perhaps most important, they saw their decision as a way to give back to their adopted community of Lyman. Lyman expresses in its Master Plan the strong desire to stay rural and promote agriculture, as well as protect scenic views and wildlife habitat.  The Hanaway conservation easement helps achieve all of these objectives.

The house itself is excluded from the conservation easement area. The conserved area includes a pond and stream.

The Hanaway land is also a key part in the lives of bats. The NH Wildlife Action Plan ranks the Hanaway forests as important feeding areas for bats which hibernate not far away on Gardner Mountain – in hibernacula (caves) on land now also conserved with ACT. The Hanaways wish to protect the Conservation Area because they want it to remain open for agriculture and wildlife, not lost to development.  The Hanaways also feel strongly about giving back to the community.  Lyman expresses in its Master Plan the strong desire to stay rural and promote agriculture, as well as protect scenic views and wildlife habitat.  The Hanaway conservation easement helps achieve all of these objectives.

 Thanks to Bill and Lorraine for their forward thinking – and their appreciation of the past! 

ACT forestry advisor Brendan Whittaker use a Biltmore stick to measure the girth (DBA: diameter at breast height) of a white ash, a species associated with good forest soils.

 

ACT Executive Director Rebecca Brown joins Lorraine and Bill on their woodlot. The work of creating a conservation easement tailored to the Hanaway’s goals and land included learning more about their forest.

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